The American Religion

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Chu Hartley Publishers #ad - H. Bloom finds that our spiritual beliefs provide an exact portrait of our national character. Brilliantly successful…. An exegesis of the religions themselves, concentrating on those sects whose origins are particularly rooted in American history and American patterns of thought…. Oakes, commonweal “An evocative, provocative and memorable account.

Martin E. A great bolt of originality:  Bloom manages to wade into a hopelessly over-explored territory and point out precisely those landmarks that everyone else has missed. Remarkable ideas remarkably set forth. Kirkus reviews “this is the most important book on American religion in a long time…. Bloom exposes, as scarcely anyone has before, an eccentricity at our spiritual center.

The washington post “a novel analysis of the American soul … insightful and pungent. The new york times “A remarkable diagram of the religious imagination…. Bellah, provocative in its thesis, and often very, New Oxford Review “An amazing book:  dazzling in its insights, very funny in its observations.

In this fascinating work of religious criticism 2006 edition, christian science, Seventh-day Adventism, Mormonism, Jehovah’s Witnesses, with a new Afterword by the author, Harold Bloom examines a number of American-born faiths:  Pentecostalism, Southern Baptism and Fundamentalism, and African American spirituality.

The American Religion #ad - He traces the distinctive features of american religion while asking provocative questions about the role religion plays in American culture and in each American’s concept of his or her relationship to God. Marty, the christian century “A rigorous, eccentric yet absorbing effort to isolate what makes American religion American.

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Possessed by Memory: The Inward Light of Criticism

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Knopf #ad - And though he has written before about some of these authors, written in the winter of his life, these exegeses, are movingly informed by "the freshness of last things. As bloom writes movingly: "One of my concerns throughout Possessed by Memory is with the beloved dead. For me poetry and spirituality fuse as a single entity.

He offers more than eighty meditations on poems and prose that have haunted him since childhood and which he has possessed by memory: from the Psalms and Ecclesiastes to Shakespeare and Dr. This also involves a knowledge of God and gods. I see imaginative literature as a kind of theurgy in which the divine is summoned, maintained, and augmented.

Possessed by Memory: The Inward Light of Criticism #ad - ". I listen not only for their voices but also for the voice I heard before the world was made. Their voices are still in my ears. I find that they are woven into what I read. Here, in a memoir of sorts--an inward journey from childhood to ninety--Bloom argues elegiacally with nobody but Bloom, instead, interested only in the influence of the mind upon itself when it absorbs the highest and most enduring imaginative literature.

My other concern is religious, in the widest sense. All my long life I have sought to isolate poetic knowledge. In arguably his most personal and lasting book, America's most daringly original and controversial critic gives us brief, luminous readings of more than eighty texts by canonical authors-- texts he has had by heart since childhood.

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The Shadow of a Great Rock: A Literary Appreciation of the King James Bible

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Yale University Press #ad - The king james bible stands at "the sublime summit of literature in English, " sharing the honor only with Shakespeare, Harold Bloom contends in the opening pages of this illuminating literary tour. Distilling the insights acquired from a significant portion of his career as a brilliant critic and teacher, he offers readers at last the book he has been writing "all my long life, " a magisterial and intimately perceptive reading of the King James Bible as a literary masterpiece.

Bloom calls it an "inexplicable wonder" that a rather undistinguished group of writers could bring forth such a magnificent work of literature, and he credits William Tyndale as their fountainhead. He invites readers to hear the baroque inventiveness in such sublime books as the Song of Songs, and Job, Ecclesiastes, and alerts us to the echoes of the King James Bible in works from the Romantic period to the present day.

The Shadow of a Great Rock: A Literary Appreciation of the King James Bible #ad - Reading the king james bible alongside tyndale’s bible, Bloom highlights how the translators and editors improved upon—or, and the original Hebrew and Greek texts, in some cases, the Geneva Bible, diminished—the earlier versions. Throughout, bloom makes an impassioned and convincing case for reading the King James Bible as literature, free from dogma and with an appreciation of its enduring aesthetic value.

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The Anatomy of Influence: Literature as a Way of Life

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Yale University Press #ad - In this, his most comprehensive and accessible study of influence, Bloom leads us through the labyrinthine paths which link the writers and critics who have informed and inspired him for so many years. The result is "a critical self-portrait, the anatomy of influence adapts bloom's classic work the anxiety of influence to show us what great literature is, " a sustained meditation on a life lived with and through the great works of the Western canon: Why has influence been my lifelong obsessive concern? Why have certain writers found me and not others? What is the end of a literary life?Featuring extended analyses of Bloom's most cherished poets—Shakespeare, Tennyson, and others, Whitman, Browning, and Crane—as well as inspired appreciations of Emerson, Ashbery, Yeats, how it comes to be, and why it matters.

Each chapter maps startling new literary connections that suddenly seem inevitable once Bloom has shown us how to listen and to read. Literary criticism, " writes harold bloom in The Anatomy of Influence, that is to say, as I attempt to practice it, "is in the first place literary, personal and passionate.

The Anatomy of Influence: Literature as a Way of Life #ad - For more than half a century, Bloom has shared his profound knowledge of the written word with students and readers. A fierce and intimate appreciation of the art of literature on a scale that the author will not again attempt, The Anatomy of Influence follows the sublime works it studies, inspiring the reader with a sense of something ever more about to be.

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Early Mormonism and the Magic World View

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Signature Books #ad - Ninety-four photographs and illustrations accompany the text. Quinn’s impressive research provides a much-needed background for the environment that produced Mormonism. This thoroughly researched examination into occult traditions surrounding Smith, his family, and other founding Mormons cannot be understated.

Among the practices no longer a part of mormonism are the use of divining rods for revelation, astrology to determine the best times to conceive children and plant crops, magic formula utilized to discover lost property, the study of skull contours to understand personality traits, and the wearing of protective talismans.

Early Mormonism and the Magic World View #ad - In this ground-breaking book, D. He explains that the smith family’s treasure digging was not unusual for the times and is vital to understanding how early Mormons interpreted developments in their history in ways that differ from modern perceptions. Michael quinn masterfully reconstructs an earlier age, finding ample evidence for folk magic in nineteenth-century New England, as he does in Mormon founder Joseph Smith’s upbringing.

Quinn discovers that smith’s world was inhabited by supernatural creatures whose existence could be both symbolic and real.

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The Daemon Knows: Literary Greatness and the American Sublime

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Spiegel & Grau #ad - New york times bestseller • named one of the best books of the year by the washington post and kirkus reviewshailed as “the indispensable critic” by the new york review of books, Harold Bloom—New York Times bestselling writer and Sterling Professor of Humanities at Yale University—has for decades been sharing with readers and students his genius and passion for understanding literature and explaining why it matters.

. The primary strength of the daemon knows is the brilliance and penetration of the connections Bloom makes among the great writers of the past, the shrewd sketching of intellectual feuds or oppositions that he calls agons. Eliot, and william faulkner with hart crane, bloom places these writers’ works in conversation with one another, exploring their relationship to the “daemon”—the spark of genius or Orphic muse—in their creation and helping us understand their writing with new immediacy and relevance.

The Daemon Knows: Literary Greatness and the American Sublime #ad - A product of five years of writing and a lifetime of reading and scholarship, The Daemon Knows may be Bloom’s most masterly book yet. Intoxicating. Now he turns at long last to his beloved writers of our national literature in an expansive and mesmerizing book that is one of his most incisive and profoundly personal to date.

. Radiant.

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The Western Canon

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Houghton Mifflin Harcourt #ad - The Western Canon #ad - He argues against ideology in literary criticism; he laments the loss of intellectual and aesthetic standards; he deplores multiculturalism, Afro-centrism, Marxism, neoconservatism, feminism, and the New Historicism. Harold bloom explores our Western literary tradition by concentrating on the works of twenty-six authors central to the Canon.

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Lear: The Great Image of Authority Shakespeare's Personalities Book 3

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Scribner #ad - The aged, like bloom himself—is at once the consummate figure of authority and the classic example of the fall from grace and widely agreed to be Shakespeare’s most moving, abused monarch—a man in his eighties, tragic hero. From one of the greatest shakespeare scholars of our time, wise, deeply compelling portrait of lear, arguably Shakespeare’s most tragic and compelling character, a beloved professor who has taught the Bard for over half a century—an intimate, the third in a series of five short books hailed as Harold Bloom’s “last love letter to the shaping spirit of his imagination” The New York Times Book Review.

King lear is one of the most famous and compelling characters in literature. Now he brings that insight to his “measured, thoughtful assessment of a key play in the Shakespeare canon” Kirkus Reviews. Award-winning writer and beloved professor Harold Bloom writes about Lear with wisdom, exuberance, joy, and compassion.

Lear: The Great Image of Authority Shakespeare's Personalities Book 3 #ad - . He also explores his own personal relationship to the character: just as we encounter one Anna Karenina or Jay Gatsby when we are seventeen and another when we are forty, Bloom writes about his shifting understanding—over the course of his own lifetime—of this endlessly compelling figure, so that the book also becomes an extraordinarily moving argument for literature as a path to and a measure of our humanity.

Lear is a “short, superb book that has a depth of observation acquired from a lifetime of study” Publishers Weekly. Bloom is mesmerizing in the classroom, wrestling with the often tragic choices Shakespeare’s characters make.

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Macbeth: A Dagger of the Mind Shakespeare's Personalities Book 5

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Scribner #ad - Macbeth is a distinguished warrior hero, transforms into a brutal, who over the course of the play, murderous villain and pays an extraordinary price for committing an evil act. Bloom is mesmerizing in the classroom, wrestling with the often tragic choices Shakespeare’s characters make. A man consumed with ambition and self-doubt, Macbeth is one of Shakespeare’s most vital meditations on the dangerous corners of the human imagination.

From the greatest shakespeare scholar of our time, lear, one of william Shakespeare’s most complex and compelling anti-heroes—the final volume in a series of five short books about the great playwright’s most significant personalities: Falstaff, Cleopatra, comes a portrait of Macbeth, Iago, Macbeth.

Macbeth: A Dagger of the Mind Shakespeare's Personalities Book 5 #ad - From the ambitious and mad titular character to his devilish wife lady macbeth to the moral and noble Banquo to the mysterious Three Witches, performed in innovative productions set in a vast array of times and locations, Macbeth is one of William Shakespeare’s more brilliantly populated plays and remains among the most widely read, from Nazi Germany to Revolutionary Cuba.

He delivers that kind of exhilarating intimacy and clarity in Macbeth, the final book in an essential series. He also explores his own personal relationship to the character: just as we encounter one Anna Karenina or Jay Gatsby when we are seventeen and another when we are forty, Bloom writes about his shifting understanding—over the course of his own lifetime—of this endlessly compelling figure, so that the book also becomes an extraordinarily moving argument for literature as a path to and a measure of our humanity.

Award-winning writer and beloved professor Harold Bloom investigates Macbeth’s interiority and unthinkable actions with razor-sharp insight, agility, and compassion.

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Iago: The Strategies of Evil Shakespeare's Personalities Book 4

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Scribner #ad - It remains widely performed across professional and community theatre alike and has been the source for many film and literary adaptations. Why and how does iago use lies and deception—the fake news of the 15th century—to destroy Othello and several other characters in his path? What can Othello tell us about racism? Bloom is mesmerizing in the classroom, treating Shakespeare’s characters like people he has known all his life.

. One of william shakespeare’s most provocative and culturally relevant plays, betrayal, love, Othello is widely studied for its complex and enduring themes of race and racism, trust, and repentance. He delivers exhilarating intimacy and clarity in these pages, writing about his shifting understanding—over the course of his own lifetime—of this endlessly compelling figure, so that Iago also becomes an extraordinarily moving argument for literature as a path to and a measure of our humanity.

Iago: The Strategies of Evil Shakespeare's Personalities Book 4 #ad - Now award-winning writer and beloved professor Harold Bloom investigates Iago’s motives and unthinkable actions with razor-sharp insight, agility, and compassion. There are few readers more astute than Bloom” Publishers Weekly, and his Iago is a provocative study for our time. From one of the greatest shakespeare scholars of our time, Harold Bloom presents Othello’s Iago, perhaps the Bard’s most compelling villain—the fourth in a series of five short books about the great playwright’s most significant personalities.

Few antagonists in all of literature have displayed the ruthless cunning and deceit of Iago. Denied the promotion he believes he deserves, Iago takes vengeance on Othello and destroys him.

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Falstaff: Give Me Life Shakespeare's Personalities Book 1

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Scribner #ad - Bloom is mesmerizing in the classroom, wrestling with the often tragic choices Shakespeare’s characters make. He uses the relationship between Falstaff and Hal to explore the devastation of severed bonds and the heartbreak of betrayal. In this first of five books about shakespearean personalities, Bloom brings erudition and boundless enthusiasm” Kirkus Reviews, starred review and his exhilarating Falstaff invites us to look at a character as a flawed human who might live in our world.

. Just as we encounter one type of anna karenina or Jay Gatsby when we are young adults and another when we are middle-aged, Bloom writes about his own shifting understanding of Falstaff over the course of his lifetime. Ultimately we come away with a deeper appreciation of this profoundly complex character, and this “poignant work” Publishers Weekly, starred review as a whole becomes an extraordinarily moving argument for literature as a path to and a measure of our humanity.

Falstaff: Give Me Life Shakespeare's Personalities Book 1 #ad - He is companion to prince hal the future henry V, who loves him, goads, indulges his vast appetites, teases him, and commits all sorts of mischief with him—some innocent, him, some cruel. Award-winning author and esteemed professor Harold Bloom writes about Falstaff with the deepest compassion and sympathy and also with unerring wisdom.

Falstaff can be lewd, a bad creditor, careless of others, an unreliable friend, funny, and in the end, devastatingly reckless in his presumption of loyalty from the new King. From harold bloom, wise, the new york times book review and an intimate, one of the greatest Shakespeare scholars of our time comes “a timely reminder of the power and possibility of words and the last love letter to the shaping spirit of Bloom’s imagination” front page, deeply compelling portrait of Falstaff—Shakespeare’s greatest enduring and complex comedic characters.

Falstaff is both a comic and tragic central protagonist in Shakespeare’s three Henry plays: Henry IV, Parts One and Two, and Henry V.

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