Light at the Edge of the World: A Journey Through the Realm of Vanishing Cultures

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Douglas & McIntyre #ad - As he investigates the dark undercurrents tearing people from their past and propelling them into an uncertain future, Davis reiterates that the threats faced by indigenous cultures endanger and diminish all cultures. In light at the edge of the world, davis explores the idea that these distinct cultures represent unique visions of life itself and have much to teach the rest of the world about different ways of living and thinking.

Light at the Edge of the World: A Journey Through the Realm of Vanishing Cultures #ad - His passion as an ethnobotanist has brought him to the very center of indigenous life in places as remote and diverse as the Canadian Arctic, the mountains of Tibet, the rain forests of Borneo, the deserts of North Africa, and the surreal cultural landscape of Haiti. For more than 30 years, renowned anthropologist Wade Davis has traveled the globe, studying the mysteries of sacred plants and celebrating the world’s traditional cultures.

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The Wayfinders: Why Ancient Wisdom Matters in the Modern World CBC Massey Lectures

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House of Anansi Press #ad - In polynesia we set sail with navigators whose ancestors settled the Pacific ten centuries before Christ. Every culture is a unique answer to a fundamental question: what does it mean to be human and alive? In The Wayfinders, winner of the prestigious Samuel Johnson Prize, renowned anthropologist, and National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Wade Davis leads us on a thrilling journey to celebrate the wisdom of the world's indigenous cultures.

In the amazon we meet the descendants of a true lost civilization, the Peoples of the Anaconda. And finally we settle in Borneo, where the last rainforest nomads struggle to survive. Rediscovering a new appreciation for the diversity of the human spirit, as expressed by culture, is among the central challenges of our time.

The Wayfinders: Why Ancient Wisdom Matters in the Modern World CBC Massey Lectures #ad - In the andes we discover that the earth really is alive, while in Australia we experience Dreamtime, the all-embracing philosophy of the first humans to walk out of Africa. For at risk is the human legacy -- a vast archive of knowledge and expertise, a catalogue of the imagination. Understanding the lessons of this journey will be our mission for the next century.

We then travel to nepal, where we encounter a wisdom hero, a Bodhisattva, who emerges from forty-five years of Buddhist retreat and solitude.

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Don't Sleep, There Are Snakes: Life and Language in the Amazonian Jungle Vintage Departures

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Vintage #ad - The pirahã have no counting system, no concept of war, no fixed terms for color, and no personal property. Everett was so impressed with their peaceful way of life that he eventually lost faith in the God he'd hoped to introduce to them, and instead devoted his life to the science of linguistics. A riveting account of the astonishing experiences and discoveries made by linguist Daniel Everett while he lived with the Pirahã, a small tribe of Amazonian Indians in central Brazil.

Don't Sleep, There Are Snakes: Life and Language in the Amazonian Jungle Vintage Departures #ad - Daniel everett arrived among the Pirahã with his wife and three young children hoping to convert the tribe to Christianity. Everett quickly became obsessed with their language and its cultural and linguistic implications. Part passionate memoir, part scientific exploration, thought, Everett's life-changing tale is riveting look into the nature of language, and life itself.

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The Serpent and the Rainbow

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Simon & Schuster #ad - The serpent and the rainbow combines anthropological investigation with a remarkable personal adventure to illuminate and finally explain a phenomenon that has long fascinated Americans. Drawn into a netherworld of rituals and celebrations, Davis penetrated the vodoun mystique deeply enough to place zombification in its proper context within vodoun culture.

The Serpent and the Rainbow #ad - A scientific investigation and personal adventure story about zombis and the voudoun culture of Haiti by a Harvard scientist. In april 1982, ethnobotanist wade davis arrived in Haiti to investigate two documented cases of zombis—people who had reappeared in Haitian society years after they had been officially declared dead and had been buried.

. In the course of his investigation, in effect, where vodoun culture is, Davis came to realize that the story of vodoun is the history of Haiti—from the African origins of its people to the successful Haitian independence movement, down to the present day, the government of Haiti’s countryside.

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Shadows in the Sun: Travels to Landscapes of Spirit and Desire

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Shearwater #ad - Ranging from the british columbian wilderness to the jungles of the Amazon and the polar ice of the Arctic Circle, Shadows in the Sun is a testament to a world where spirits still stalk the land and seize the human heart. Its essays and stories, the wisdom of lives drawn directly from the land, though distilled from travels in widely separated parts of the world, are fundamentally about landscape and character, the hunger of those who seek to rediscover such understanding, and the consequences of failure.

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The Last Speakers: The Quest to Save the World's Most Endangered Languages

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National Geographic #ad - The Last Speakers: The Quest to Save the World's Most Endangered Languages #ad - David harrison's expeditions around the world to meet with last speakers of vanishing languages. Thought-provoking and engaging, graphics, traditional wisdom never before translated into English, interviews, this unique book illuminates the global language-extinction crisis through photos, and first-person essays that thrillingly convey the adventure of science and exploration.

Part travelogue and part scientist's notebook, The Last Speakers is the poignant chronicle of author K. The speakers' eloquent reflections and candid photographs reveal little-known lifeways as well as revitalization efforts to teach disappearing languages to younger generations.

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Into the Silence: The Great War, Mallory, and the Conquest of Everest

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Vintage #ad - In davis’s rich exploration, he creates a timeless portrait of these remarkable men and their extraordinary times. Sandy irvine was a twenty-two-year-old Oxford scholar with little previous mountaineering experience. Theirs was a country broken, and the Everest expeditions emerged as a powerful symbol of national redemption and hope.

The definitive story of the british adventurers who survived the trenches of World War I and went on to risk their lives climbing Mount Everest. On june 6, two men set out from a camp perched at 23, 1924, 000 feet on an ice ledge just below the lip of Everest’s North Col. George mallory, thirty-seven, was Britain’s finest climber.

Into the Silence: The Great War, Mallory, and the Conquest of Everest #ad - Neither of them returned. Drawing on more than a decade of prodigious research, bestselling author and explorer Wade Davis vividly re-creates the heroic efforts of Mallory and his fellow climbers, setting their significant achievements in sweeping historical context: from Britain’s nineteen-century imperial ambitions to the war that shaped Mallory’s generation.

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River Notes: A Natural and Human History of the Colorado

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Island Press #ad - If it ceased flowing, the water held in its reservoirs might hold out for three to four years, New Mexico, but after that it would be necessary to abandon most of southern California and Arizona, and much of Colorado, Utah and Wyoming. Plugged by no fewer than twenty-five dams, and san diego, and much of the power and water of Los Angeles and Phoenix, the Colorado is the world’s most regulated river drainage, providing most of the water supply of Las Vegas, Tucson, cities that are home to more than 25 million people.

The story of the colorado river is the human quest for progress and its inevitable if unintended effects—and an opportunity to learn from past mistakes and foster the rebirth of America’s most iconic waterway. A beautifully told story of historical adventure and natural beauty, River Notes is a fascinating journey down the river and through mankind’s complicated and destructive relationship with one of its greatest natural resources.

River Notes: A Natural and Human History of the Colorado #ad - . For the entire american southwest the colorado is indeed the river of life, its delta dry and deserted, it has been reduced to a shadow upon the sand, which makes it all the more tragic and ironic that by the time it approaches its final destination, its flow a toxic trickle seeping into the sea. In this remarkable blend of history, how it once flowed freely and how human intervention has left it near exhaustion, acclaimed author Wade Davis tells the story of America’s Nile, local species, volume, and personal observation, altering the water temperature, science, and shoreline of the river Theodore Roosevelt once urged us to “leave it as it is.

Yet despite a century of human interference, quiet pools, the splendor of the Colorado lives on in the river’s remaining wild rapids, Davis writes, and sweeping canyons.

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One River: Explorations and Discoveries in the Amazon Rain Forest

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Simon & Schuster #ad - In the 1970s, tim plowman and wade davis, the notorious source of cocaine, he sent two prize students, to follow in his footsteps and unveil the botanical secrets of coca, a sacred plant known to the Inca as the Divine Leaf of Immortality. A stunning account of adventure and discovery, one river is a story of two generations of explorers drawn together by the transcendent knowledge of Indian peoples, betrayal and destruction, the visionary realms of the shaman, and the extraordinary plants that sustain all life in a forest that once stood immense and inviolable.

The story of two generations of scientific explorers in South America—Richard Evans Schultes and his protégé Wade Davis—an epic tale of adventure and a compelling work of natural history. In 1941, professor richard evan schultes took a leave from Harvard and disappeared into the Amazon, where he spent the next twelve years mapping uncharted rivers and living among dozens of Indian tribes.

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When Languages Die: The Extinction of the World's Languages and the Erosion of Human Knowledge Oxford Studies in Sociolinguistics

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Oxford University Press #ad - Harrison's book is a testament not only to the pressing issue of language death, but to the remarkable span of human knowledge and ingenuity. K. The phenomenon known as language death has started to accelerate as the world has grown smaller. This extinction of languages, and the knowledge therein, has no parallel in human history.

This knowledge is not only our cultural heritage oral histories, poetry, stories, etc. But very useful knowledge about plants, animals, the seasons, and other aspects of the natural world--not to mention our understanding of the capacities of the human mind. It will fascinate linguists, anthropologists, and general readers.

When Languages Die: The Extinction of the World's Languages and the Erosion of Human Knowledge Oxford Studies in Sociolinguistics #ad - It is commonly agreed by linguists and anthropologists that the majority of languages spoken now around the globe will likely disappear within our lifetime. He uses fascinating anecdotes and portraits of some of these languages' last remaining speakers, in order to demonstrate that this knowledge about ourselves and the world is inherently precious and once gone, will be lost forever.

David harrison's book is the first to focus on the essential question, what is lost when a language dies? What forms of knowledge are embedded in a language's structure and vocabulary? And how harmful is it to humanity that such knowledge is lost forever?Harrison spans the globe from Siberia, to North America, to the Himalayas and elsewhere, to look at the human knowledge that is slowly being lost as the languages that express it fade from sight.

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Our Land Was A Forest: An Ainu Memoir Transitions : Asia and Asian America

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Routledge #ad - A master storyteller, farming, fishing, which revolved around bear hunting, he paints a vivid picture of the ecologically sensitive Ainu lifestyle, and woodcutting. Kayano describes with disarming simplicity and frankness the personal conflicts he faced as a result of the tensions between a traditional and a modern society and his lifelong efforts to fortify a living Ainu culture.

This book is a beautiful and moving personal account of the Ainu, whose land, economy, Japan's northern island, the native inhabitants of Hokkaidō, and culture have been absorbed and destroyed in recent centuries by advancing Japanese. Unlike the few existing ethnographies of the Ainu, this account is the first written by an insider intimately tied to his own culture yet familiar with the ways of outsiders.

Our Land Was A Forest: An Ainu Memoir Transitions : Asia and Asian America #ad - Based on the author's own experiences and on stories passed down from generation to generation, the book chronicles the disappearing world—and courageous rebirth—of this little-understood people. Speaking with a rare directness to the Ainu and universal human experience, this book will interest all readers concerned with the fate of indigenous peoples.

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